Women don't want reconciliation

 

Večernji list, Thursday, June 17, 1999
MAIN HEARING OF PRIVATE LAWSUIT BY FOURTEEN WOMEN AGAINST MILAN IVKOŠIĆ POSTPONED

WOMEN DON’T WANT RECONCILIATION WITH MILAN IVKOŠIĆ


In his depiction of activities of women’s organizations and their members, the columnist has stated that this was the case about “more-or-less Croatian women who came from the Yugoslav Secret Police, Yugoslav Police and Yugo-military political and family milieus” who “primarily support non-Croatian women”

S. Srdoč


ZAGREB – Milan Ivkošić, a columnist for Večernji list, who was sued by fourteen activists from women’s nongovernmental organizations for criminal offences against their honour and reputation, evaded the scheduled main hearing at the Municipal Court in Zagreb yesterday because his lawyers failed to appear at court. Ivkošić’s lawyers, Marijan and Ana Šakić, excused themselves due to a death in their family on Tuesday.
-  I propose that we do not proceed without my lawyers if they should be needed – Milan Ivkošić suggested. Judge Zdravko Majerović rescheduled the hearing for September 16 and declared that the charges would be rejected if the plaintiffs fail to justify their possible non-appearance at the next scheduled hearing. The judge stated that Ivkošić would be brought to court by the police if he failed to appear at the court without justification.
It should be pointed out that Ivkošić’s “Patriotic naggings“ column published in June of last year under the headline “Them” was the cause for this collective private lawsuit on the grounds of libel and slander. In his article, Ivkošić commented the statements made in the show “Press-klub” by Rada Borić, coordinator at the Centre for Women War Victims, about the violence against women, stating that she was “openly defending the position of Great Serbian fascism“.

In his depiction of activities of women’s organizations and their members, the columnist further stated that this was a case about “more-or-less Croatian women who came from the Yugoslav Secret Police, Yugoslav Police and Yugo-military political and family milieus” who “primarily support non-Croatian women” and that the standpoint of the loudest ones – is the total opposite of the desirable Croatian family. Namely, some women, in addition to being married and without children or older but single, are fighting for the independent choice of women to make decisions about their bodies and child-bearing, do not have these relations at all since they are, as Ivkošić has diagnosed, lesbians. Their organizations are primarily “Yugo-political” and their activities show the “degenerative level to which their collapsed but missed state, the Great Serbian Yugoslavia, has fallen.” In other words, “anti-women who fight for women” – concluded Ivkošić.
The columnist, however, was surprisingly subdued amongst all the women at the hearing. 
                                   
It was noted in the court records, at the suggestion of lawyer Gordana Lukač-Koritnik, that none of the plaintiffs agreed to a peaceful settlement of the criminal trial.

Ivkošić before the European Court for Human Rights?

“This article not only offends women in women’s organizations but also discriminates every individual woman. Our concern is in the political side of the entire story: we expected that the State Attorney General would carry out his official duty but as he has failed to do so, we have decided to file a private lawsuit. And since the Constitution prohibits nationalism, racial and gender discrimination, we are ready to file a lawsuit before the European Court for Human Rights” – Rada Borić stated, expressing her regrets over the prolongation of the trial. The other plaintiffs shared her disappointment: Biljana Kašić, Slavica Kušić, Maja Mamula, Biserka Momčinović, Sniježana Matejčić, Ljubica Matijević-Vrsaljko, Nela Pamuković, Nataša Lalić, Jagoda Miligrad-Šmid, Tanja Uroda and Bojana Genov.